kathrynjudson

Posts Tagged ‘freedom’

Carter and the Cubans

In Uncategorized on April 2, 2011 at 1:41 pm

Humberto Fontova reports on Jimmy Carter’s recent trip to Cuba, and gives some background.

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Chaput on Christianity

In Uncategorized on May 11, 2009 at 8:42 pm

Charles J. Chaput offers some straight talk on New Life in Christ: What it Looks Like, What it Demands (First Things, May 11, 2009).

Notwithstanding that Chaput is devotedly Catholic, and William Wilberforce adamantly wasn’t, this article reminds me of Wilberforce’s writings on real Christianity.

Land of the brave, but not of the free?

In Uncategorized on May 7, 2009 at 3:27 pm

From wjactv.com:

Feds To Seize Private Land For 9/11 Memorial

Posted: 1:04 pm EDT May 7, 2009Updated: 1:12 pm EDT May 7, 2009

National Park Service officials said they will begin taking land for the Flight 93 memorial in Somerset County from property owners because negotiations have been unsuccessful.

The service said it will condemn about 500 acres still needed for the memorial to be built in time for the 10th anniversary of the 2001 terrorist attacks…

European Court of Human Rights comes down…

In Uncategorized on February 11, 2009 at 6:17 pm

… on the side of religious freedom in Bulgaria. (Should I have warned you to sit down before reading that?)

The ADF press release linked above reads:

STRASBOURG, France — A dissenting synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church that had its legal personality stripped and its property seized by the socialist government of Bulgaria has won a decisive victory at the European Court of Human Rights. Alliance Defense Fund allied attorney Latcho Popov argued that the Bulgarian government violated the European Convention of Human Rights in its treatment of the synod.

“The church should remain free of government coercion and control,” said ADF Legal Counsel Roger Kiska, who performed most of the work on the case while serving at the European Centre for Law and Justice before recently joining ADF. “The Bulgarian government vastly overstepped its bounds in stripping the synod of its legal identity, seizing its property, and handing it over to a synod of which the government approves. We are pleased with the ruling of the ECHR, which respects the alternative synod’s freedom and independence.”|

“This victory is crucial for the American church as well,” explained ADF Chief Counsel Benjamin Bull. “Bad precedents set in other parts of the world too often find their way here. A positive decision this significant underscores the vital importance of the church operating independently of state coercion and control. When the church is not free and independent, uncompromised teaching is replaced by whatever ‘politically correct’ messages the government wants.”

Kiska explained that many governments throughout history have used the church to gain power by suppressing the free exercise of denominations that compete with a state-sanctioned church that provides very little, if any, criticism of the government.

More than 80 percent of Bulgarians identify themselves as Bulgarian Orthodox. Fifteen years ago, about 40 percent dissented from the Bulgarian Orthodox Church and its leader Patriarch Maxim, arguing that he was not validly elected under BOC canon law and that he was aligned too closely with the communist regime. They elected there [sic] own leadership and built a number of their own churches.

Five years ago, the new socialist-dominated government passed a law on religions that effectively stripped the dissenting synod of their legal personality and access to the legal system. The Bulgarian chief prosecutor issued a warrant demanding that all the synod’s properties be confiscated. In one evening, more than 100 churches were confiscated. They were kept under police control and eventually given to the state-approved Synod of Maxim.

Popov, director of the Rule of Law Institute, then filed an application to the ECHR on behalf of the dissenting synod, and the court ruled strongly in favor of the church’s religious freedom. Settlement negotiations in light of the court’s ruling are currently in progress.

Ex-liberal pacifist gets a gun

In Uncategorized on February 7, 2009 at 5:54 pm

Barbara Curtis has an encore presentation of an article she wrote back in 2000, when threats against gun ownership prompted her to get a gun.

Another ‘Free Choice’ proposition to watch out for

In Uncategorized on December 12, 2008 at 4:47 pm

The so-called Freedom of Choice Act (also known as FOCA), would provide legal bulldozers to the abortion industry in the United States, for use in flattening opposition. Not that a billion dollar industry that kills people on a per-hire basis needs more sledgehammers than it already has, in my opinion, but what do I know? (At least I have company. More than 330,000 people have already signed a Fight FOCA petition, as just the tip of the iceberg in the fight against this horrific bit of proposed policy, which would strip away the few feeble laws that protect the most vulnerable women and girls amongst us.)

In another arguably dishonest use of language, the so-called Employee Free Choice Act would provide brand new legal bulldozers to unions, not least by turning thugs loose on workers who currently enjoy the protection of voting by secret ballot. (Uhm, folks, there are reasons secret ballots are considered part and parcel of advanced civilizations…) Joust the Facts has a look.

More on Christianity, history, and culture

In Uncategorized on December 11, 2008 at 5:42 pm

Robert at Expat Yank takes on some of those who would like to “free” us from Christianity without stopping to think what it has meant even to unbelievers.

Persecution of homeschoolers…

In Uncategorized on November 19, 2008 at 12:40 pm

… in Germany is so bad it has prompted one family to apply for political asylum in the United States. (via Alliance Alert)

Rounded up for Nov. 8, 2008

In Uncategorized on November 8, 2008 at 9:57 am

A doctor in Washington state has some thoughtful ideas on changes to make in the wake of the election.

Bookworm uses a memorable scene from a Narnia book to illustrate the problems other conservatives seem to have communicating with Blacks and Hispanics.

Jonah Goldberg suggests that “while the election is still fresh in our minds, let us look at some of the goofy assumptions and buzzwords that defined so much of the coverage discussion this year.” Yes, let’s. (hat tip: Bookworm Room) Hmmm. I wonder if Mr. Goldberg has read Charles J. Chaput’s Little Murders article… They’re both writing about political vocabulary…

Good news and bad news out of the Methodist Church’s 2008 General Conference. And may I offer my thanks to the delegates from Africa? They might yet save the church – and thereby those who listen to its teaching.

This February, Oregon started requiring that Social Security numbers be verified by the folks who issue driver’s licenses. Since then, the number of people taking the driver’s license test in Spanish has dropped by more than 90 percent. Other languages have been unaffected, the report says.

This might or might not be related: immigration officials say that more than 10,000 illegal aliens were deported from Oregon, Washington, and Alaska between October 2007 and September 2008. Nationwide over the same period, the “repatriation” figure was 341,041, one third of whom had prior criminal convictions.

The bad news is that the Obama camp thought it was a good idea to require students from middle school through college to perform community service. The good news is that they can jettison a really bad idea when they hear the opposition building. Please note that I disagree with the tone and rhetoric at the Gateway Pundit post. I linked there because he’s got before and after screen shots from the Change.gov website. (hat tip: Head Noises, which yesterday had a post mulling the economic and freedom aspects of the proposed mandate as it then stood.) I spent part of this morning working on a post discussing the proposed mandate. I’m glad I checked around today, before I spent much more time on it. I would have been fighting what is now a straw man. President Clinton, as I remember it, was prone to saying one thing on Monday and changing course one or more times as the week progressed, without seeming to notice the contradictions. During his administration, I think I reread Animal Farm twice. It just somehow seemed strangely applicable. Perhaps it’s time to find a copy and do a bit of review…

Added: I do think it’s important to acknowledge what this election meant to some people, symbolically. Also, if this presidency defangs the Jesse Jackson types of this country, it will have done a long-overdue good thing. I just wish the symbolic guy didn’t come with so many worrisome friends, theories, and propositions.