kathrynjudson

Posts Tagged ‘pro-life’

“Life: Imagine the Potential” video

In Uncategorized on February 7, 2009 at 3:48 pm

The folks at CatholicVote.com have my thanks for making this ad.

As of post time, it’s had 1,447,445 views at YouTube.

hat tip: The CatholicVote.com blog

(Cross-posted at Ladies for Life and Suitable For Mixed Company.)

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Another ‘Free Choice’ proposition to watch out for

In Uncategorized on December 12, 2008 at 4:47 pm

The so-called Freedom of Choice Act (also known as FOCA), would provide legal bulldozers to the abortion industry in the United States, for use in flattening opposition. Not that a billion dollar industry that kills people on a per-hire basis needs more sledgehammers than it already has, in my opinion, but what do I know? (At least I have company. More than 330,000 people have already signed a Fight FOCA petition, as just the tip of the iceberg in the fight against this horrific bit of proposed policy, which would strip away the few feeble laws that protect the most vulnerable women and girls amongst us.)

In another arguably dishonest use of language, the so-called Employee Free Choice Act would provide brand new legal bulldozers to unions, not least by turning thugs loose on workers who currently enjoy the protection of voting by secret ballot. (Uhm, folks, there are reasons secret ballots are considered part and parcel of advanced civilizations…) Joust the Facts has a look.

Rounded up for Nov. 8, 2008

In Uncategorized on November 8, 2008 at 9:57 am

A doctor in Washington state has some thoughtful ideas on changes to make in the wake of the election.

Bookworm uses a memorable scene from a Narnia book to illustrate the problems other conservatives seem to have communicating with Blacks and Hispanics.

Jonah Goldberg suggests that “while the election is still fresh in our minds, let us look at some of the goofy assumptions and buzzwords that defined so much of the coverage discussion this year.” Yes, let’s. (hat tip: Bookworm Room) Hmmm. I wonder if Mr. Goldberg has read Charles J. Chaput’s Little Murders article… They’re both writing about political vocabulary…

Good news and bad news out of the Methodist Church’s 2008 General Conference. And may I offer my thanks to the delegates from Africa? They might yet save the church – and thereby those who listen to its teaching.

This February, Oregon started requiring that Social Security numbers be verified by the folks who issue driver’s licenses. Since then, the number of people taking the driver’s license test in Spanish has dropped by more than 90 percent. Other languages have been unaffected, the report says.

This might or might not be related: immigration officials say that more than 10,000 illegal aliens were deported from Oregon, Washington, and Alaska between October 2007 and September 2008. Nationwide over the same period, the “repatriation” figure was 341,041, one third of whom had prior criminal convictions.

The bad news is that the Obama camp thought it was a good idea to require students from middle school through college to perform community service. The good news is that they can jettison a really bad idea when they hear the opposition building. Please note that I disagree with the tone and rhetoric at the Gateway Pundit post. I linked there because he’s got before and after screen shots from the Change.gov website. (hat tip: Head Noises, which yesterday had a post mulling the economic and freedom aspects of the proposed mandate as it then stood.) I spent part of this morning working on a post discussing the proposed mandate. I’m glad I checked around today, before I spent much more time on it. I would have been fighting what is now a straw man. President Clinton, as I remember it, was prone to saying one thing on Monday and changing course one or more times as the week progressed, without seeming to notice the contradictions. During his administration, I think I reread Animal Farm twice. It just somehow seemed strangely applicable. Perhaps it’s time to find a copy and do a bit of review…

Added: I do think it’s important to acknowledge what this election meant to some people, symbolically. Also, if this presidency defangs the Jesse Jackson types of this country, it will have done a long-overdue good thing. I just wish the symbolic guy didn’t come with so many worrisome friends, theories, and propositions.

Rounded up Nov. 7, 2008

In Uncategorized on November 7, 2008 at 10:22 am

(Do you ever have days where you can’t get back to a draft to get it posted? With my apologies, this is a several-days-strung-together round-up.)

Massively rich, philanthropist rock star’s skyscraper will be on land seized by the government?

Jim Tonkowich muses on reading Brideshead Revisited through bifocals… (There’s a point. Really.) I’d been led to believe that Brideshead Revisited was a book I should avoid like the plague. Perhaps I was misled?

Michael Novak suggests that now is not the time to rehearse grave doubts about the President-elect. I find myself more or less in agreement. Or, as Mark Steyn puts it, “As for us losers, there’s no point going down the right-wing version of Bush Derangement Syndrome.”

That’s not to say we can’t still wonder if the media isn’t a bit too personally invested in Left-wing politics. I wouldn’t know, personally. I asked myself why I was giving the news-cum-entertainment industry so much of my time, and couldn’t come up with a good answer, so these days I give them far less time to try to mislead me or try to convince me that celebrity watching is for some reason important. (Do you understand their obsession with performers? The fascination eludes me.)

I wish I’d linked to this before this election, but (for future reference) there’s something to remember when you vote in the United States of America – lot of blood was shed to turn us into citizens instead of subjects. And there is, indeed, a difference between citizens and subjects (and nothing that says citizens can’t revert to subjects if they aren’t careful).

And nothing says people can’t cross party lines when the party crosses them. Heh. I wish there had been more of them, of course, but, well… you take what you can get, right? I would also like to steal a quote made in passing in this post, because I also depend on a small business for my livelihood: “Sylvia has worked in small business her entire life so she’s a natural Republican; she knows how government just gets in the way of business and free enterprise.” Oh, my, yes. Our costs and headaches are going up in January, again. Even if McCain had won, we were looking at cutting hours of operation and/or getting rid of an employee so that we’d have enough to pay the others. Needless to say, we hope we can hold the line there, but we doubt the Democrats will help matters.

Changing the subject, but only slightly: A bit of info on ethanol mandates and food prices, and changing food supplies. But here’s a countering view on food prices, based on other criteria.

Patrick over at The Paragraph Farmer has had several good posts lately, but the quote I can’t resist is from a pre-election post (with lots of links I should probably go back and read). Sayeth Patrick:

Christians in my own church and elsewhere have been urged to pray for a pro-life outcome “no matter which candidate wins.” Heartfelt advice like that goes a long way toward preserving tax-exempt status in a litigious society, but let’s not kid ourselves: a pro-life outcome with the Republican ticket is a good bet, while a pro-life outcome in the aftermath of an Obama/Biden victory requires a miracle of the kind that slapped Saul upside the head on the road to Damascus. 

I’d say that cuts to the car chase.

Patrick also has some wisdom from Michael Crichton on science versus consensus.

Rounded up Oct. 23, 2008

In Uncategorized on October 23, 2008 at 3:00 pm

I’ve been busy rounding up news and views over at Ladies for Life. If you know of a pro-life lady who would like to be added to the blogroll, please have her read the Oct. 9 posts. Her blog doesn’t need to discuss pro-life issues, it just has to be hosted or co-hosted by a pro-life lady.

At Hey Plumber Joe: Been There, Done That (American Thinker, Oct. 17, 2008), C. Edmund Wright explains a few things the Left doesn’t seem to understand about running a small business. (via CM, Children and Lots of Grace)

From Bookworm Room, “Some thoughts to carry with you.” (Among them, “The state has no conscience.”)

Also from Bookworm Room, the last half of the post to be filed under the ‘Funny Only If It Doesn’t Really Happen’ heading, “Long hidden species carefully emerges from hiding,” takes a look at the possible future from the perspective of a conservative living in a particularly non-conservative part of California.

If you missed Joe Biden promising an international crisis if Sen. Obama becomes president, Cal Thomas has it covered, with commentary.

Were you taught that Americans on the left and Americans on the right had the same goals, and only differed in their ideas on how to get there? I was. And for a long time I believed it. But Dennis Prager has concluded that simply isn’t so, and I think I have to agree with him.

India has launched its first moon mission. In the article, it says that Japan and China sent probes to the moon last year. If everything goes as planned, India will become the fourth nation with a flag there, joining the US, Russia, and Japan, the article further says. (I’m a bit behind on space news, obviously.)

Rounded up October 20, 2008

In Uncategorized on October 20, 2008 at 11:01 am

Via Bookworm Room, Ed Morrissey has some ideas on what it means when the media tries to destroy “the man Obama picked at random to ask a question.” (emphasis in original)

Bookworm provides a lesson in history to counter a friend’s wish for a more powerful government. In another post, she uses a comparison of European history and American history to explain why Sen. Obama’s “share the wealth” argument isn’t perhaps such a good idea.

Charles J. Chaput defends unborn babies, honest use of language, vigorous public debate, and proper respect for one another. He also says “If American Catholics don’t know history, and especially their own history as Catholics, then somebody else – and usually somebody not very friendly – will create their history for them.” The article is based on an address he gave to a Catholic group. Otherwise he might have pointed out that’s largely true for anyone, Catholic or not.

Speaking of Catholics, when a Texas newspaper ran an article in response to a pro-life statement made by Texas bishops, The Practicing Catholic ran the article with corrections and commentary. I think she clears things up nicely.

Anthony Esolen muses on Modernity as Confinement, and on joy versus the cocoon of “self-fulfillment”. He notes in passing that “Nothing is farther from joy than a snicker.” C.S. Lewis, if I remember correctly, had a few things to say about flippancy that were along the same lines… Now, if I could remember if it was in Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, I’d be set…